Category Archives: Professional Studies Resources

How should leaders respond to the firestorm over high-states assessments? | School Leadership Matters

Source: How should leaders respond to the firestorm over high-states assessments? | School Leadership Matters

This is a “reblogged” entry from Sheri Williams’ School Leadership Matters Blog.  Wise words that have value beyond the realm of school leadership, I think.
— EdProf


Action in Teacher Education Journal: Call for Reviewers

Here is an invitation from Tom Lucey of the Action in Teacher Education Journal (by way of the AERA Qualitative Research SIG).
The editing team of Action in Teacher Education, a national peer reviewed journal that publishes scholarship relating to research in teacher education (pre- and in-service) and pedagogy, seeks reviewers for manuscripts submitted to the journal.  We are looking for teaching and research faculty from across research methodologies and areas of expertise with the time, and willingness to conduct rigorous analyses of submissions and provide constructive feedback that informs editors and authors about manuscripts’ strengths and weaknesses.
Those interested should send an email providing their (1) name, (2) title, (3) affiliation, (4) research foci, and (5) methodological expertise to   This is a journal of the Association of Teacher Educators.

If you are a member of AERA, be sure to check the website for additional opportunities for reviewing conference paper proposals as well as journal manuscripts.  –Edprof

Codes of Ethics in the Professions

The Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions (at the Illinois Institute of Technology) hosts an extensive collection of codes of ethics across many different fields.  A valuable resource for professional studies scholars, researchers and practicing professionals in all fields.

Codes of Ethics Collections |

The Condition of Education


Protesting Against Education Budget Cuts
Protesting Against Education Budget Cuts (Photo credit: infomatique)

My previous post noted that tuition pays only a small portion of the cost of higher education in public colleges and universities.  According to this year’s Condition of Education report, in 2009 – 2010, tuition accounted for about 16 – 18 percent of the total revenue of  public postsecondary institutions (and 90% of private, for-profit post-secondary institutions).  The Condition of Education is a report mandated by the United States federal government and published each year by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).  The report is available for download at no charge and contains a wealth of information about educational institutions at all levels, including elementary and secondary, postsecondary, public, private non-profit and private, for-profit institutions.  This is a rich, detailed, well-organized and trustworthy analysis of massive amounts of data that can be very useful for academic research and writing projects.

Here are a few direct quotes that reflect current conditions and changing trends in higher education (from the 2012 Condition of Education Overview).  A useful and informative resource:

In 2009–10, more than half of the 1.7 million bachelor’s degrees awarded were in five fields: business, management, marketing, and personal and culinary services (22 percent); social sciences and history (10 percent); health professions and related programs (8 percent); education (6 percent); and psychology (6 percent) (indicator 38).

Approximately 56 percent of male and 61 percent of female first-time, full-time students who sought a bachelor’s degree at a 4-year institution in fall 2004 completed their degree at that institution within 6 years (indicator 45).

In 2011, some 32 percent of 25- to 29-year-olds had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher. From 1980 to 2011, the gap in the attainment of a bachelor’s degree or higher between Whites and Hispanics widened from 17 to 26 percentage points, and the gap between Whites and Blacks widened from 13 to 19 percentage points (indicator 48).

In 2010, young adults ages 25–34 with a bachelor’s degree earned 114 percent more than young adults without a high school diploma or its equivalent, 50 percent more than young adult high school completers, and 22 percent more than young adults with an associate’s degree (indicator 49).


The Condition of Education — Index  —  [The 2012 report and related information can be downloaded from this site.  An ebook of the report is also available.]

The Condition of Education — Overview, Section 3 – Postsecondary Education and Outcomes —

The Condition of Education — Postsecondary Revenues